Dan Raabe Performance - Train For A Reason - Gymnastics, Conditioning, Mental Strength, Tactics, Skilled Movement, Training

 

 

 

Who doesn’t have 20 minutes to train? The answer is my favorite conversation. It has to do with you and exploring your negative connotation of selfishness. Let’s admit that our preoccupation with comforts may be a little wimpy. Taking action to evolve a more significant life is attractive. Do you want others to see you in the image of how you look at yourself? Are you selfish enough to create a new personal portrait as an attractive, convincing winner on the track to success?

Selfishness is a good habit. In the context of you taking care of yourself first, you build the health and strength to take care of the talented people around you. It begins with a want and ends with a reward. The habit of in-action is what you must change. If your routines are active, then they create attractive patterns, and you win.

Do your methods include the kind act of self-development. If the answer is yes, you’re on your way to a new positive outcome. You are building power.

Reasonable is irrational if the outcome isn’t positive. The result of a stronger physiology through proper exercise is the big point. What’s in it for me becomes tangible when the investment in training time comes from expert skills, consistent activity, and safe performance. Build your presence on physical and mental changes that are the positive reward of a process of training, because being reasonable isn’t in your blood.

Resolve your life’s most intimate, unrealized issues. Get up earlier. Visualize the day:

“You are standing in the gym, alone, beaming in your shiny new shorts with the swoosh. Your rash-guard makes every curve in your sturdy frame stand out and shout, “I am a warrior!” You are warmed up and ready to become the self-made athlete you’ve always dreamed you could be. Rap madness is playing in your ears. You are badass! The coach raises his hand. His thumb presses forcefully on the start button, and you hear the pinging beep of the stopwatch fill the gym. It’s game on.

You reach down to grab the bar. You are in perfect form. You’ve trained for this moment. There is a man-ly weight on this rope of steel. All the eyes of the gym are on you. As your hips drop into perfect lift-off position, your firm, supple hands reach the cold, knurled steel bar. Chalkdust is aloft in the bright morning sun. And you lock on. Lift! And nothing happens. It won’t move. It’s stuck to the floor. You scream, but no one runs to your aid. You’re unreachable. It’s the slo-mo version of Road Runner. Then, as if ordered by the gods of iron, your kid wakes you up to get the milk out of the ’fridge, and it’s all over. Exit dreamland.”

You must be truthful to win. There is no truth in dreaming that someday success, top performance, and sustainable health will happen. It’s “You Inc” beginning now. Your plan must include all personal development within your reach – physical and mental.

Having a great body, eternal youth, and a six-pack that would bring Marilyn Monroe back from the grave isn’t worth the energy if it comes from the negative connotation of selfish. Understand the context of the documentary you make of yourself. Focus on you and the people you love the most. They depend on you, and with that knowledge, you have the freedom to be the master of selfish. Give to yourself. You deserve it. You are in this for the outcome – for yourself and those around you who allow you to be the alpha in their lives.

Training is your best friend. It will never let you down. It goes with you everywhere. It never says no. It always makes you better. No matter what the circumstance, training will still support your high experience. It’s foundational. It’s the pressure to do the right thing when you need it most. It’s support when good intentions and energy turn around and bite you in the backside because it is simple, functional, rejuvenating, creative, inspirational, portable, available. It’s a noun and a verb! Training is the autonym in this book – the thing itself and the action.

Get some selfish going. Your life depends on your investment in self-actualization. Partner passion with strategy. Discover your “Why.” Why do you train? Because it’s the right thing to do.

Find your bottom line. That’s the wet-eyed, passionately desired, emotionally anchored, drop dead, bottom-of-the-barrel reason that you are alive on the planet. The reason you made kids and put them on the same journey as you. It’s the thrill of making your first house payment. It’s the feeling of accomplishment as you are driving your new Ferrari. It’s your self-appointment to the CEO position of “You Inc.”

Selfish is a healthy expression. It’s the cherry pie you baked and weren’t too busy to taste. You make a more profound commitment to un-realized abilities. Your presentation of yourself to the world will be noticeable. Selfish people look at peace with themselves. It’s the sunshiny side of your accountability to yourself. It’s not the reward, but there is a reward in sampling it every day.

Let’s all be a little more selfish. It’s sexy. It’s creative, and it’s human.

“The label self-care refers to prioritizing your physical health and psychological well-being by engaging in good eating habits, exercise, sleep, relaxation, and enjoyable activities every day. Proponents of self-care like to point out that unless we take care of ourselves first, we will not be well enough to help and take care of others.” – John A. Johnson, Ph.D. –  https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cui-bono/201501/good-neutral-and-bad-selfishness

Dan Raabe Performance - Train For A Reason - Gymnastics, Conditioning, Mental Strength, Tactics, Skilled Movement, Training #trainforareason #danraabetraining

Inspiration precedes every action. Why? Because inspiration is the blood supply of motivation, learning, and follow through. It’s the heartbeat of will-power. Without will-power, there is no self-control. Self-control is a precursor to success.

How many uninspired projects have you undertaken? Your determination might have seen you through to the end. Or perhaps it fizzled, unfinished. With a lack of inspiration, your motivation waned, and the effort soon became drudgery.

We have one precious chance to impact our life’s outcome. If our actions are congruent with our desired results, then it’s easy to understand why finding inspiration is such a necessary component. It improves how we arrive at an outcome we targeted. You will hear me say, “Train for a reason.” Actions taken towards goals are not decisions. They are dates for your future.

How many people must we meet, interview, and build relationships with before we find someone who asks the magic question, “Can you teach me how to do that?” Life would be so easy if adults automatically got inspired just by intrinsic enthusiasm.

A coach can inspire athletes to act for their good. A good coach can also teach the executive athlete how to use their prowess to accomplish the enormous goals in their life. The motivation to act on a good premise comes from inspiration.

Watching the Olympics, I never fail to ask, “How did she/he do that?” Every event requires a unique skill set. There must be some tipping point when you cease to accept the status quo for yourself, and your physical preparedness. I became a coach when I realized that I could answer the question, “How do I get strong?” My inspiration comes from meeting successful, skilled people, and taking account of where I fit into this potentially powerful group. When I feel weak, I find inspiration from, “I train because I want to be strong,” Once you identify and commit to your goals, the second step is assured. There can be no considerations to keep you from achieving.

In the training culture, the kid inside you plays, and the adult safely does the work. We work in a different context that puts training on our calendar. Physical accomplishments become congruent with life’s goals. We operate outside of the reason to train. We train because we are focused on the outcomes.

“Taking action to participate requires three motivators: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. It’s my idea. I’m confident I can do it. I belong here, and I’m worthy.”
Richard Ryan and Edward Deci

If you like this article and want more information, please contact me at coach@danraabetraininig.com or call/text to (303) 880-4641. We focus on the forties plus professional because it’s important to stay in motion, build a solid foundation for health, and hone the skills of self-control. Don’t look for a reason to train, Train for a Reason.

Dan Raabe Performance - Train For A Reason - Gymnastics, Conditioning, Mental Strength, Tactics, Skilled Movement, Training

Dynamic people are a product of the activities engaging them and the time they invest. Business professionals track themselves with exercise elevating their endurance and creativity. Imagine utilizing the power equation (power equals force times distance divided by time) to set personal goals and determine the efficacy of your current output. Force is willpower. Distance focuses on completion of tasks. Understanding the “priority of the important” will make the time variable unique. You must work to the exclusion of all urgencies. Your performance (your power) is meant to reflect the efficiency of your professional skills.

Physical training parallels functional work skills. It’s a process we call adaptation. We win in the gym and take our mental and physical gains to the business of life and career. As we learn to invest the effort to win consistently, we can more easily accept increases in performance intensity. Make the connection between training and performance in and out of the gym. Talent isn’t born. We build it.

Professionals respect time. How do twenty minutes of focused training parallel a twenty-minute business pitch? Both take skill. Sell the sizzle, not the steak. You can ruin a pitch that over-runs its welcome. You can destroy the potential benefit of physical exercise by ignoring the skills, consistency, and intensity balance within specific time parameters. Concentrate on the basics. Pay strict attention to the time invested.

Here’s a method I use:

1. Write everything down you want to accomplish during the day – everything.
2. Prioritize the top tasks that will make a difference to you and your company. Take the rest of the urgent issues and make a joke about them. Immediate problems are an escape from priority tasks. Don’t allow yourself to escape.
3. Include three workouts per week at a time of day when you need it most. Don’t demote this commitment unless it’s a matter of life or death.

Stay on top of your calendar. Give all tasks a time slot and duration to complete. Steep and high priority tasks only need a mental activation to begin. It’s that simple.

Discover why you need to move, think, and act at full speed. Your brain is on board for twenty minutes of extreme focus. Short steps makes the work easier. Try taking a hike for two hours while daydreaming on one topic. Many mental dramas later you’ll remember what you thought when you started. Human architecture includes an active mind. Physical activity inspires activation of your neurological machine.